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Something

Mona Arshi // Oct. 30, 2019

DoubleBlind is devoted to fair, rigorous reporting by leading experts and journalists in the field of psychedelics. Read more about our editorial process and fact-checking here. Editorially reviewed by Madison Margolin.

something scrambled
out of me at least I thought
it was out of me
it could have been into me
very fast very sly
dirty breath’d assassin
 
spiders
ants                earthworms
I witnessed
being dissected by my brothers
and crane flies
I tried
 
but never managed
to capture
whole   such fey stupid wings
and legs left drifting on walls
mostly I was a witness
mostly
 
I’ve kept
out of  the way with
my hood zipped
up to my chin
what is the surest thing
we know?
 
that as we grow older
we think less of
killing things and more
of coming back
who knows where
we acquire our knowledge
 
from our mothers   aunts
perhaps
they pass it on
like a candle through
an ancient pockmarked door
something parenthetic
 
like a clasp
broken     useless as a rotten wick
a spider climbing
the sublime coast
of  your shoulders
walking through those rooms again
 
a web breaking
on the back of  your hand
 

Mona Arshi worked as a Human Rights lawyer at Liberty before she started writing poetry. She completed her Masters in poetry in 2011 at the University of East Anglia with a distinction. Her debut collection SMALL HANDS, published by Liverpool University imprint Pavilion Poetry, won the Forward Prize for best first collection in 2015. She has also been a prizewinner in the Magma, Troubadour and Manchester creative writing competitions.

“Something” by Mona Arshi. Copyright © 2018 by Mona Arshi, used by permission of the Wylie Agency LLC.

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Zach Sokol is a writer, editor, and producer who’s based in New York. From 2017 through 2020, he worked as Features Editor and then Managing Editor of MERRY JANE, Snoop Dogg’s cannabis and culture publication. Sokol’s writing and photos have been published in a number of online and print publications, including Playboy, VICE, The Village Voice, ARTNews, Penthouse, Art in America, The Paris Review, FADER, i-D, and more. Visit his website www.zachsokol.com for his latest writing, or follow him on Twitter and Instagram @zachsokol.

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